permaculture The best free cultural & educational media on the web – Open Culture

The best free cultural & educational media on the web – Open Culture http://www.openculture.com/

The best free cultural & educational media on the web

Audio Books
Online Courses
Certificate Courses/MOOCs
Movies
Languages
K-12 Resources
eBooks

http://www.openculture.com/

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permaculture Hong Kong protesters set for the long haul at self-sustaining village | Reuters

Hong Kong protesters set for the long haul at self-sustaining village | Reuters
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/24/us-hongkong-china-village-idUSKCN0IC13S20141024?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews&utm_source=twitter

(Reuters) – Hong Kong protesters have created a self-sustaining village within a month of taking their call for democracy to the streets, setting up changing rooms, tents for hire, a study area, first-aid stations and even their own security patrols as they ready for the long haul.

What started out as hastily built barricades against police pepper spray and tear gas, relying mainly on cling film and umbrellas, has evolved into a fully fledged campus with carpeted stairs, water coolers, WiFi and gas-fueled generators supporting mobile phones, desk lamps and amplifiers.

And when rain pounds the village, which straddles a major thoroughfare in the heart of Hong Kong, dozens set to work.

“It’s instant architecture. We are just improvising,” said 31-year-old artist George Wong. “When it started to rain, over a dozen people made a cover over the study area within 15 minutes.”

Hong Kong returned from British to Chinese rule in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” formula that allows it wide-ranging autonomy and freedoms and specifies universal suffrage for choosing its leader as an ultimate goal.

But Communist Party leaders in Beijing have insisted on screening candidates for the job first, prompting the popular, and in the most part courteous, dissent.

The student-led protesters now appear to be settling in indefinitely, even though the government is powerless to change the financial hub’s “Basic Law” mini-constitution and go against Beijing rule.

The protesters have blocked major arteries on both sides of the picture-postcard harbor, with police sporadically clearing barricades in places. The camp at Admiralty, home to government offices and next to the Central business district, is the best organized and most settled.

Supporters say the site has developed organically, without a main organizer, but there are distinct teams in charge of areas like security, medical care, recycling and art work. Team members break into three shifts, morning, afternoon and night.

Alvin L, a snowboard coach in Vancouver who grew up in Hong Kong, is a member of the defense team, equipped with a walkie-talkie and whistle.

“There are several teams who share information. We have a defense line checking how many cops there are. If someone whistles, we can help direct people where to go.”

DRYING RACKS AND TOOTHBRUSH HOLDERS

The medical team, made up of more than 200 people, works across four main stations in Admiralty. Supply stations stocked with toilet paper and saline water to Nescafe and granola bars – all free for any passersby – are dotted every few yards and manned by around 40 volunteers.

“We are starting to see more people building for shelter and improving the infrastructure in Admiralty,” said Johnson Yeung of Civil Human Rights Front, the main organizer of an annual march for democracy coinciding with the anniversary of Beijing’s violent crackdown on pro-democracy protesters on June 4, 1989.

Beatrice Chiu, a member of the Democratic Party, said numbered tents were available for rent – provided demonstrators registered their identity card number and kept the tents clean.

Large tents are available for people to get ready for work in the morning with holders to store their toothbrushes next door.

Drying racks made from string attached to street lamps hang clothes and towels while a temporary shower area has been dismantled to expand a 30-metre study area with wooden tables, desk lamps and stationery. A nearby board covered in pastel Post-it notes advertises free lessons ranging from Korean to engineering and ethics.

Suited office workers ferry bowls of congee and tea around tents while some protesters sit outside their tents reading newspapers and smart phones.

“I usually go home to shower after work and come back here at night,” said Karen Tsang, a teacher, as she zipped up her tent to leave for work on Thursday. Tsang says she uses the nearby toilet at a nearby building while others have been going to McDonald’s and KFC and using facilities such as the shower room at nearby squash courts.

Protesters say the camp has been funded by themselves, sympathetic businesses and others willing to donate food and supplies.

“We will not accept people’s money. Everyone can bring supplies,” said Alvin. “Even (airline) staff have been bringing hand wash and toilet wipes.”

Environmental awareness also appears to be strong.

The artist Wong, dressed in brown flip-flops and fuchsia shorts, detailed how to recycle each part of a bottle by peeling off labels, separating the caps and then flattening the plastic for the recycling team to collect.

“We are all helping each other,” he said. “It is all self-motivated. For instance, when the drain starts flooding, we go to mop it up.”

(Additional reporting by Donny Kwok, Charlie Zhu and Clare Baldwin ; Editing by Nick Macfie
)

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permaculture Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture

*Libertarian municipalism*
:

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permaculture Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture

That is wonderful, Bob. Thanks for the followup.
It is not too late to adopt village democracy, bringing empowerment, clout, authority,
semi-autonomy to citizens throughout the USA. First, communities need to devise ways for people without jobs to earn a living.
Solution: public works projects, grow food on open public or loaned-corporate land; use vacant building to set up manufacturing with training for employees who
will become owner/employees. Thousands of possibilities. A great starting point, substitute good water, nutritious food and exercise for alcohol, tobacco and drugs;
live clean and free, never look back.

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 3:12 PM, Bob Waldrop wrote:

> Neighborhood assemblies are one of the tactics advocated in my iPermie > book on urban permaculture for developing local systems.
>
> Here is the chapter on “Precinct Community Assemblies”.
>
> http://www.ipermie.net/pca.pdf
>
> Bob Waldrop, Okie City
>
> On 10/23/2014 12:30 PM, Lawrence London wrote:
>
>> [Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture: Could they co-exist in a >> synergistic relationship, mutually beneficial to one another?] >>
>> Murray Bookchin and Libertarian municipalism
>>
>> I had heard of Murray Bookchin long ago but never knew what his work was >> about.
>>
>> This is why the years 1950 to 1980 are so incredibly important. Amazing >> thinking and how I never ran across this before is beyond me. >> We should be paying more attention to the Kurds, and the Yazidis too. >>
>> Libertarian municipalism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_municipalism
>>
>> Libertarian Municipalism: an ideology adopted by the Kurds currently >> fighting ISIS: “The overriding problem is to change the structure of >> society so that people gain power. The best arena to do that is the >> municipality (village) where we have an opportunity to create a >> face-to-face democracy.” (en.wikipedia.org)
>> http://www.reddit.com/r/Green
>>
>>
> –
> http://www.ipermie.net How to permaculture your urban lifestyle and adapt > to the realities of peak oil, economic irrationality, political > criminality, and peak oil.
>
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture@lists.ibiblio.org
> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info|make a donation toward list > maintenance:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> message archives: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture > message archive mirrors:
> https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!forum/permaculturelist > http://permacultureforum.blogspot.com
> http://permaculturelist.wordpress.com
> Google message archive search:
> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring] > Permaculture Institute USA http://permaculture.org
> How to permaculture your urban lifestyle
> http://www.ipermie.net
> Avant Geared http://www.avantgeared.com
> https://plus.google.com/+Avantgeared
> Permaculture: — portal to an expanding global network of landtech > pioneers practicing and teaching permaculture
> while designing ecological, biointensive land use systems with integrated > elements for synergy, sustainability, regeneration and enhanced > nature-compatible
> human habitat –
>

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permaculture Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture

Neighborhood assemblies are one of the tactics advocated in my iPermie book on urban permaculture for developing local systems.

Here is the chapter on “Precinct Community Assemblies”.

http://www.ipermie.net/pca.pdf

Bob Waldrop, Okie City

On 10/23/2014 12:30 PM, Lawrence London wrote:
> [Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture: Could they co-exist in a > synergistic relationship, mutually beneficial to one another?] >
> Murray Bookchin and Libertarian municipalism
>
> I had heard of Murray Bookchin long ago but never knew what his work was > about.
>
> This is why the years 1950 to 1980 are so incredibly important. Amazing > thinking and how I never ran across this before is beyond me. > We should be paying more attention to the Kurds, and the Yazidis too. >
> Libertarian municipalism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_municipalism
>
> Libertarian Municipalism: an ideology adopted by the Kurds currently > fighting ISIS: “The overriding problem is to change the structure of > society so that people gain power. The best arena to do that is the > municipality (village) where we have an opportunity to create a > face-to-face democracy.” (en.wikipedia.org)
> http://www.reddit.com/r/Green
>

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permaculture Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture

The Permaculture Global Village and Murray Bookchin’s Libertarian Municipalism.
Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/2014-October/045314.html

Wikipedia permaculture entry:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permaculture
“Permaculture is a design system which aims to create sustainable human habitats by following nature’s patterns.”

Definitions of Permaculture
http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculture-definitions.faq

All that we are is the result of what we have thought. The mind is everything. What we think we become.

Buddha

Fukuoka san’s comment in an interview where Fukuoka san, Bill Mollison and Wes Jackson were present:
“The confusion started when humans ate the Fruit of Knowledge. Adam and Eve were thrown away from the Garden of Eden.
The only way to get back is to throw away the knowledge! Just become foolish like a bird or baby.”

Commons Thinking
http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/stibbe-handbook-of-sustainability/chapters/commons-thinking Justin Kenrick The Handbook of Sustainability Literacy, Arran Stibbe. Supported by University of Brighton, Faculty of Arts: Sustainability Network.

“Commons Thinking: the ability to envisage and enable a viable futurethrough connected action,”
Justin Kenrick, University of Glasgow, and PEDAL Portobello Transition Town

“What is Commons Thinking?
The Commons are life-sustaining or life-enhancing resources and services that have not
been divided up and assigned a monetary value in the global economy but instead are shared
freely among members of a community or group. They range from the air we breath, pollination
provided by bees, land that provides food for gathering and sharing rather than selling,
to words of comfort given freely and willingly rather than at an hourly rate.
Pitted against the Commons, however, are the forces of Enclosure, which attempt
to appropriate, own and sell resources that were once freely accessible, often breaking
up communities and displacing people in the process. Commons regimes are communities
which resist these forces and meet people’s needs primarily or significantly through the
Commons rather than through monetary exchange, existing both in the forests of the Amazon
and in the last remaining tight-knit local communities in cities around the world…
This chapter aims to describe one important skill for rebuilding political, community and
personal resilience.”

Click for pdf download of the full chapter ‘Commons Thinking’ from the Handbook for Sustainability Literacy
http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/5737/Commons-Thinking.pdf

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 1:30 PM, Lawrence London wrote:

> [Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture: Could they co-exist in a > synergistic relationship, mutually beneficial to one another?] >
> Murray Bookchin and Libertarian municipalism
>
> I had heard of Murray Bookchin long ago but never knew what his work was > about.
>
> This is why the years 1950 to 1980 are so incredibly important. Amazing > thinking and how I never ran across this before is beyond me. > We should be paying more attention to the Kurds, and the Yazidis too. >
> Libertarian municipalism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_municipalism
>
> Libertarian Municipalism: an ideology adopted by the Kurds currently > fighting ISIS: “The overriding problem is to change the structure of > society so that people gain power. The best arena to do that is the > municipality (village) where we have an opportunity to create a > face-to-face democracy.” (en.wikipedia.org)
>
> http://www.reddit.com/r/GreenParty/comments/2jvldj/libertarian_municipalism_an_ideology_adopted_by/ >
> Libertarian municipalism
> From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_municipalism
>
> Libertarian municipalism is a political program developed by libertarian > socialist theorist Murray Bookchin, to create democratic citizens’ > assemblies in towns and urban neighborhoods. The assemblies in these free > municipalities join together to replace the state with a
> directly-democratic confederation.
> Bookchin became an advocate of face-to-face or assembly democracy in the > 1950s, inspired by writings on the ancient Athenian polis by H. D. F. Kitto > and Alfred Eckhard Zimmern. For the concept of confederation, he was > influenced by the nineteenth-century anarchist thinkers. Bookchin tied > libertarian municipalism to a utopian vision for decentralizing cities into > small, human scaled eco-communities, and to a concept of urban revolution. > Libertarian municipalism uses the strategy of dual power to create a > situation in which two powers—the municipal confederations and the > nation-state—cannot coexist.
> Bookchin’s The Rise of Urbanization and the Decline of Citizenship (1986) > is an overview of the historical conflict between city and nation-state, > which also presents his municipalist program. In Burlington, Vermont, > Bookchin attempted to put these ideas into practice by working with the > Northern Vermont Greens, the Vermont Council for Democracy, and the > Burlington Greens, retiring from politics in 1990. His ideas are summarized > succinctly in Remaking Society (1989) and The Murray Bookchin Reader > (1997).[1]
> While Bookchin long placed libertarian municipalism within the framework > of political Anarchism, in the late 1990s he broke with anarchism and in > his final essay, The Communalist Project (2003), identified libertarian > municipalism as the main component of Communalism. Communalists believe > that libertarian municipalism is both the means to achieve a rational > society and structure of that society.
> Another program in which independent communities form a confederation was > written by the Swiss historian and philosopher Adolf Gasser.[2][3] His work > led an alternative proposal for a European community – the so-called > Council of European Municipalities and Regions – which was co-founded by > Gasser in 1951. It still exists today, but has limited power since the > centralized European model became the European organization with the real > power.
>
> Libertarian municipalism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia >
> Main article: Libertarian municipalism
>
> Starting in the 1970s, Bookchin argued that the arena for libertarian > social change should be the municipal level. In a 2001 interview he > summarized his views this way: “The overriding problem is to change the > structure of society so that people gain power. The best arena to do that > is the municipality — the city, town, and village — where we have an > opportunity to create a face-to-face democracy.”[27] In 1980 Bookchin used > the term “libertarian municipalism”, to describe a system in which > libertarian institutions of directly democratic assemblies would oppose and > replace the state with a confederation of free municipalities.[28] > Libertarian municipalism intends to create a situation in which the two > powers—the municipal confederations and the nation-state—cannot > coexist.[27] Its supporters—Communalists—believe it to be the means to > achieve a rational society, and its structure becomes the organization of > society.
>
> A friend of mine wrote this comment and sent it to me in email recently: > “This is the same idea that’s been around since Jericho; local > self-government, mutually decided upon by all adults in the community. It’s > the old New England town councils. Just with a new name. In fact it’s much > the same as the idea behind Nestor Makhno’s anarchism, where local villages > would all be self-governing.”
>
> Nestor Makhno – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
> en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestor_Makhno
>
> Makhnovism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
> en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makhnovism
>
> The Nestor Makhno Archive
> http://www.nestormakhno.info/
>
> –
> Lawrence F. London
> lfljvenaura@gmail.com
> http://www.avantgeared.com
> https://plus.google.com/+Avantgeared
> Ello: https://ello.co/ecoponderosa > Twitter: @ecoponderosa
> Reddit: ecoponderosa
> Cellphone: lfljcell@gmail.com
>

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permaculture Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture

[Libertarian Municipalism & Permaculture: Could they co-exist in a synergistic relationship, mutually beneficial to one another?]

Murray Bookchin and Libertarian municipalism

I had heard of Murray Bookchin long ago but never knew what his work was about.

This is why the years 1950 to 1980 are so incredibly important. Amazing thinking and how I never ran across this before is beyond me. We should be paying more attention to the Kurds, and the Yazidis too.

Libertarian municipalism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_municipalism

Libertarian Municipalism: an ideology adopted by the Kurds currently fighting ISIS: “The overriding problem is to change the structure of society so that people gain power. The best arena to do that is the municipality (village) where we have an opportunity to create a face-to-face democracy.” (en.wikipedia.org)
http://www.reddit.com/r/GreenParty/comments/2jvldj/libertarian_municipalism_an_ideology_adopted_by/

Libertarian municipalism
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_municipalism

Libertarian municipalism is a political program developed by libertarian socialist theorist Murray Bookchin, to create democratic citizens’ assemblies in towns and urban neighborhoods. The assemblies in these free municipalities join together to replace the state with a
directly-democratic confederation.
Bookchin became an advocate of face-to-face or assembly democracy in the 1950s, inspired by writings on the ancient Athenian polis by H. D. F. Kitto and Alfred Eckhard Zimmern. For the concept of confederation, he was influenced by the nineteenth-century anarchist thinkers. Bookchin tied libertarian municipalism to a utopian vision for decentralizing cities into small, human scaled eco-communities, and to a concept of urban revolution. Libertarian municipalism uses the strategy of dual power to create a situation in which two powers—the municipal confederations and the nation-state—cannot coexist.
Bookchin’s The Rise of Urbanization and the Decline of Citizenship (1986) is an overview of the historical conflict between city and nation-state, which also presents his municipalist program. In Burlington, Vermont, Bookchin attempted to put these ideas into practice by working with the Northern Vermont Greens, the Vermont Council for Democracy, and the Burlington Greens, retiring from politics in 1990. His ideas are summarized succinctly in Remaking Society (1989) and The Murray Bookchin Reader (1997).[1]
While Bookchin long placed libertarian municipalism within the framework of political Anarchism, in the late 1990s he broke with anarchism and in his final essay, The Communalist Project (2003), identified libertarian municipalism as the main component of Communalism. Communalists believe that libertarian municipalism is both the means to achieve a rational society and structure of that society.
Another program in which independent communities form a confederation was written by the Swiss historian and philosopher Adolf Gasser.[2][3] His work led an alternative proposal for a European community – the so-called Council of European Municipalities and Regions – which was co-founded by Gasser in 1951. It still exists today, but has limited power since the centralized European model became the European organization with the real power.

Libertarian municipalism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Main article: Libertarian municipalism

Starting in the 1970s, Bookchin argued that the arena for libertarian social change should be the municipal level. In a 2001 interview he summarized his views this way: “The overriding problem is to change the structure of society so that people gain power. The best arena to do that is the municipality — the city, town, and village — where we have an opportunity to create a face-to-face democracy.”[27] In 1980 Bookchin used the term “libertarian municipalism”, to describe a system in which libertarian institutions of directly democratic assemblies would oppose and replace the state with a confederation of free municipalities.[28] Libertarian municipalism intends to create a situation in which the two powers—the municipal confederations and the nation-state—cannot coexist.[27] Its supporters—Communalists—believe it to be the means to achieve a rational society, and its structure becomes the organization of society.

A friend of mine wrote this comment and sent it to me in email recently: “This is the same idea that’s been around since Jericho; local self-government, mutually decided upon by all adults in the community. It’s the old New England town councils. Just with a new name. In fact it’s much the same as the idea behind Nestor Makhno’s anarchism, where local villages would all be self-governing.”

Nestor Makhno – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestor_Makhno

Makhnovism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makhnovism

The Nestor Makhno Archive
http://www.nestormakhno.info/

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